April Preorders / On a Bernstein Birthday Note

April Preorders / On a Bernstein Birthday Note

Posted by Mike Finnegan on Apr 4th 2018

From directors who make movies for the adults in the room – craftsmen like Jacques Demy, Philip Dunne, Martin Ritt and Paul Schrader – come four provocative examinations of how human fallibility short-circuits that American Dream of a connected, fulfilling life. Sure, there’s sex in the city or sex in the suburbs across all these photoplays depicting the uptight 1950s, the breakout 1960s and the swinging 1970s, but the storytelling subtexts go deep, revealing fissures in the bonds between generations, loneliness in the clutter of urban life, and character flaws that leave scars, visible or not, all somehow captured in the camera eye of these four Twilight Time hi-def Blu-ray premieres in splendid 1080p. Preorders open today at 4 PM EST/1 PM PST for the April 17 TT hi-def Blu-ray arrivals of Auto Focus (2002), Blue Denim (1959), Model Shop (1969) and No Down Payment (1957) at www.screenarchives.com and www.twilighttimemovies.com.

Various plot motifs are covered in the April quartet: the wonder and the dread of metropolitan cityscapes, the alienation of strangers in a new place, the delights and dangers of children trying to grow up fast when adults are somewhat absent, the loss of identity when media-created legend or naked career ambition obscures reality, and the omnipresent dread of going off to or being trapped in a war zone. So it’s fitting that April’s Preorder Opening Day be dedicated to the invaluable and versatile composer Elmer Bernstein (1922-2004) on what would have been 96th birthday today. In dozens of film and TV projects across six decades, he has movingly and melodically conveyed all of the above. His seven terrific genre-spanning TT titles are expertly scored examples spanning 37 productive years: The Bridge at Remagen (1969), Devil in a Blue Dress (1995), From Noon till Three (1976), From the Terrace (1960, offered here), Hawaii (1966, exclusively here.), Kings Go Forth (1958) and The World of Henry Orient (1964).