Divine Diane

Divine Diane

Posted by Mike Finnegan on Jan 5th 2018

Time and multihyphenate talent Diane Keaton, turning 72 today, both march on, but certain patterns resonate. When commemorating the Academy Award® and 2017 AFI Lifetime Achievement Award winner’s natal day last year, observation was made of her fine work already offered in lovely 1080p on Twilight Time hi-def Blu-rays and consideration of two upcoming Keaton releases on our label, one with her early-career mentor and soulmate Woody Allen and another with other talents behind the camera. Damned if the same situation hasn’t presented itself again! At the movies, she’ll be part of a stellar quartet of ladies – Jane Fonda, Candice Bergen and Mary Steenburgen – in the feature film comedy Book Club. Although Radio Days sold out over the past year, she’s still a top TT heroine in three titles, the still-topical Charles Shyer/Nancy Meyers parenthood-vs.-careerism delight Baby Boom (1987), and two Allen favorites, the Russian-flavored period romp Love and Death (1975, located here: http://screenarchives.com/title_detail.cfm/ID/28534/LOVE-AND-DEATH-1975/) and the probative family-at-a-crossroads drama Interiors (1978). Coming next month as part of a quartet of New York-set comedies and thrillers are two more Keaton capers: Harry and Walter Go to New York (1976, directed by Mark Rydell), in which her Gay 90s crusading journalist goes toe-to-toe with conniving conmen James Caan, Elliott Gould and Michael Caine; and her last film foray with Allen, the witty, twisty and madcap contemporary caper Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993), stumblingly sleuthing the (perhaps) sordid details behind a mysterious sudden death in the company of Alan Alda, Anjelica Huston, Jerry Adler, Marge Redmond, Joy Behar, Ron Rifkin and Zach Braff. Reflections on both of those new-to-hi-def discoveries will follow in the coming weeks, but no deep introspection is needed to confer on birthday laureate Keaton a TT Most Valuable Player trophy.